The choice of meat is of the utmost importance: It should not have too much grain but have enough connective tissues to produce a great sauce, as Gerd Wolfgang Sievers reminds us in the introduction to his Viennese “Gravy Goulash” recipe in “Wiener Beisel Kochbuch”. It’s best to use boneless shank or shin, “Wadschinken” (sometimes “Wadschunken”) as both are called in Vienna.

The choice of meat is of the utmost importance: It should not have too much grain but have enough connective tissues to produce a great sauce, as Gerd Wolfgang Sievers reminds us in the introduction to his Viennese "Gravy Goulash" recipe in "Wiener Beisel Kochbuch". It's best to use boneless shank or shin, "Wadschinken" (sometimes "Wadschunken") as both are called in Vienna.

The choice of meat is of the utmost importance: It should not have too much grain but have enough connective tissues to produce a great sauce, as Gerd Wolfgang Sievers reminds us in the introduction to his Viennese “Gravy Goulash” recipe in “Wiener Beisel Kochbuch”. It’s best to use boneless shank or shin, “Wadschinken” (sometimes “Wadschunken”) as both are called in Vienna.

Nino Loss
Hi, I'm Nino, an unbridled foodnik blogging from Vienna, the city of dreams and Sigmund Freud. I'm cooking up a therapy with recipes and stories from Viennese cuisine and its eclectic influences – Jewish, Italian, Hungarian, Bohemian... – with an armchair psychoanalytical twist.

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