Eating like the emperor, only with my fork (allowing me to indulge in my narcissism by looking at myself in the unused polished knife), this extra tender, juicy and lean Viennese poached beef cut is called “Mageres Meisel (or Mäuserl).” It is a typical cut served as boiled beef. I serve it with a bit of soup, topped with chives, coarse sea salt, a potato rösti on the side  a latke to be precise  and, of course, horseradish, apple-horseradish or, like here, beet-horseradish, one of my favorites.

Eating like the emperor, only with my fork (allowing me to indulge in my narcissism by looking at myself in the unused polished knife), this extra tender, juicy and lean Viennese poached beef cut is called "Mageres Meisel (or Mäuserl)." It is a typical cut served as boiled beef. I serve it with a bit of soup, topped with chives, coarse sea salt, a potato rösti on the side — a latke to be precise — and, of course, horseradish, apple-horseradish or, like here, beet-horseradish, one of my favorites.

Eating like the emperor, only with my fork (allowing me to indulge in my narcissism by looking at myself in the unused polished knife), this extra tender, juicy and lean Viennese poached beef cut is called “Mageres Meisel (or Mäuserl).” It is a typical cut served as boiled beef. I serve it with a bit of soup, topped with chives, coarse sea salt, a potato rösti on the side  a latke to be precise  and, of course, horseradish, apple-horseradish or, like here, beet-horseradish, one of my favorites.

Nino Loss
Hi, I'm Nino, an unbridled foodnik blogging from Vienna, the city of dreams and Sigmund Freud. I'm cooking up a therapy with recipes and stories from Viennese cuisine and its eclectic influences – Jewish, Italian, Hungarian, Bohemian... – with an armchair psychoanalytical twist.

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