This juicy, “saftig” in German (of utmost importance here!), and lean Viennese beef cut is called Mageres Meisel (or Mäuserl) and is a typical piece of meat served as boiled beef. Here I serve it with a small ladle of soup, topped with chives, coarse sea salt, alongside a potato rösti (a latke) and, of course, horseradish (I had my beloved apple-horseradish and beet-horseradish just outside the frame).

This juicy, “saftig” in German (of utmost importance here!), and lean Viennese beef cut is called Mageres Meisel (or Mäuserl) and is a typical piece of meat served as boiled beef. Here I serve it with a small ladle of soup, topped with chives, coarse sea salt, alongside a potato rösti (a latke) and, of course, horseradish (I had my beloved apple-horseradish and beet-horseradish just outside the frame).

This juicy, “saftig” in German (of utmost importance here!), and lean Viennese beef cut is called Mageres Meisel (or Mäuserl) and is a typical piece of meat served as boiled beef. Here I serve it with a small ladle of soup, topped with chives, coarse sea salt, alongside a potato rösti (a latke) and, of course, horseradish (I had my beloved apple-horseradish and beet-horseradish just outside the frame).

Nino Loss
Hi, I'm Nino, an unbridled foodnik blogging from Vienna, the city of dreams and Sigmund Freud. I'm cooking up a therapy with recipes and stories from Viennese cuisine and its eclectic influences – Jewish, Italian, Hungarian, Bohemian... – with an armchair psychoanalytical twist.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top